Implementing On-Premise Private and Hybrid Clouds

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Ubuntu Workshop at Cloud Expo April 23, 2009  - Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope) has been released today bringing highly interesting new features, specially in the Cloud Computing and Virtualization area. The new Ubuntu server distribution includes two complementary cloud tools, OpenNebula and Eucalyptus, so providing the technology required to build the three types of Cloud architectures, namely private, hybrid and public clouds. Eucalyptus can be used to transform an existing infrastructure into an IaaS public cloud, being compatible with Amazon’s EC2 interface. Eucalyptus is fully functional with respect to providing cloud-like interfaces and higher-level cloud functionality for security, contextualization and image management. OpenNebula, on the other hand, is a virtual infrastructure engine that enables the dynamic and scalable deployment and re-placement of grou... (more)

The Top 150 Players in Cloud Computing

Cloud Expo Early Bird Savings A robust ecosystem of solutions providers is emerging around cloud computing. Here, SYS-CON's Cloud Computing Journal expands its list of most active players in the fast-emerging Cloud Ecosystem, from the 'mere' 100 we identified back in January of this year, to half as many again - testimony, if any further were needed, to the fierce and continuing growth of the "Elastic IT" paradigm throughout the world of enterprise computing. Editorial note: The words in quotation marks used to describe the various services and solutions in this round-up are in every case taken from the Web sites cited. As ever we encourage software engineers, developers, IT operations managers, and new/growing companies in every case to "suck it and see" by downloading or otherwise sampling the offering in question for themselves. (Omissions to this Top 150 list sh... (more)

Eucalyptus Open Sources Services & Training

Eucalyptus, the open source private cloud platform partnered with Amazon to give people hybrid clouds, has found selling support and professional services, the usual way an open source company makes money, isn't working as a business because would-be customers are too tight-fisted. As a result it didn't grow as much as expected last year. So it's regrouping. It's open sourcing its services and training, CEO Marten Mickos said, to focus on its product business, where it's seeing early indications of large cloud implementations and the potential for a big business thanks in part to its alliance with Amazon, whose APIs are the recognized cloud standard. Initial contracts brought in $50,000-$100,000 apiece, he said. Amazon is helping a bit, but Eucalyptus is doing most of its own lead generation. Consulting contracts, evidently few and far between, averaged around $20,0... (more)

Marten Mickos of Eucalyptus Joins Cloud Expo Silicon Valley Faculty

The industry is heated with debates on whether adopting private or public cloud is the smartest, best, cheapest, you name it choice. But this debate is missing the mark. Businesses shouldn't be discussing public vs. private, but rather how can they make the two work together to their greatest advantage. The ideal is to merge on-premise and off-premise into a seamless environment that can be managed as a single entity - a forward-looking stance that will eventually see major adoption. But as of late 2013, hybrid cloud was still "rare," noted Gartner analyst Tom Bittman. In his session at 15th Cloud Expo, Marten Mickos, CEO of Eucalyptus Systems, will discuss how public clouds need on-premise satellites to win and, conversely, how on-premise environments cannot be really powerful unless they are connected to the public cloud. It's not two competing worlds; it's two ... (more)

SYS-CON's 1st International Cloud Computing Conference & Expo: Show Report

Dmitry Sotnikov's Blog Overall, very exciting times, and a great event put together by the folks at SYS-CON! There was a lot of excitement and optimism throughout the event. As someone put it: cloud computing is about 700 days old. That means that there are a lot of arguments about definitions, and where things are going, and so on. And that also gives a lot of vibe and a lot of fresh community spirit. Below are my notes from all the sessions I attended at the last week’s Cloud Computing Expo 2008 on: Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 A few general comments on the conference. First and foremost, cloud computing is happening. There was a lot of excitement and optimism throughout the event. And frankly this was quite contrasting to the SOA keeping talking about whether SOA is getting anywhere, how to justify SOA projects, whether it is a journey or a destination, and so on. This was... (more)

RightScale to Extend Cloud Management to Private & Hybrid Clouds

"Cloud computing technology is evolving rapidly, giving users many more choices for where and how to develop, test and deploy applications on the cloud, depending on the level of security, regulatory compliance, scalability and cost savings desired," said Thorsten von Eicken, RightScale CTO and founder. RightScale has announced that the RightScale Cloud Management Platform will support the global debut of the Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud (powered by Eucalyptus) to help enterprises deploy and manage "private" clouds in their own data centers. Organizations that install the just-announced "technology preview" release of Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud, which is released as part of the Ubuntu 9.04 Server Edition, will be able to create Eucalyptus-based private clouds on their internal IT infrastructure and can then choose to register them with the RightScale Cloud Management Platf... (more)

Mirror on the Wall, Who’s the Prettiest Cloud of All?

Forrester Research has run up a study of private cloud vendors and rated them on 10 criteria: self-service portal or service catalog; dynamic workload management; resource management; service management; integration and control APIs; image library; RBAC administration; virtualization layer; physical compute & storage; and last but not least application services. Against these yardsticks it measured 15 companies. In descending order they are Platform Computing, HP, IBM, VMware, Abiquo, BMC, Dell, CA, TIBCO, newScale, Cloud.com, Eucalyptus, Hexagrid, Microsoft and Enomaly. Among the purer player vendors - heck against all of them - Platform Computing walks off with first prize ahead of HP, IBM and VMware with a total score of 26 out of a possible 40. HP, IBM and VMware tie for second place with 25, making Abiquo third with 23. newScale is sixth with 19 points followe... (more)

Cloud Expo New York Speaker Profile: Mårten Mickos – Eucalyptus Systems

With Cloud Expo 2012 New York (10th Cloud Expo) now just one week away, what better time to remind you in greater detail of the distinguished individuals in our incredible Speaker Faculty for the technical and strategy sessions at the conference... We have technical and strategy sessions for you every day from June 11 through June 14 dealing with every nook and cranny of Cloud Computing and Big Data, but what of those who are presenting? Who are they, where do they work, what else have they written and/or said about the Cloud that is transforming the world of Enterprise IT, side by side with the exploding use of enterprise Big Data – processed in the Cloud – to drive value for businesses...? CLOUD EXPO SPEAKER NAME: Mårten Mickos TWITTER: @martenmickos COMPANY: Eucalyptus Systems 10TH CLOUD EXPO SESSION TITLE: Clouds Are All About APIs SESSION DESCRIPTION: http://cloud... (more)

Cloud Computing vs. Grid Computing - What's the Difference?

Thorsten von Eicken's RightScale Blog Recently Rich Wolski (UCSB Eucalyptus project) and I were discussing grid computing vs. cloud computing. An observation he made makes a lot of sense to me. Since he doesn’t blog [...], let me repeat here what he said. Grid computing has been used in environments where users make few but large allocation requests. For example, a lab may have a 1000 node cluster and users make allocations for all 1000, or 500, or 200, etc. So only a few of these allocations can be serviced at a time and others need to be scheduled for when resources are released. This results in sophisticated batch job scheduling algorithms of parallel computations. Cloud computing really is about lots of small allocation requests. The Amazon EC2 accounts are limited to 20 servers each by default and lots and lots of users allocate up to 20 servers out of the pool... (more)

Creating a Common Cloud Computing Reference API - Part One

Reuven Cohen's "ElasticVapor" Blog Over the last few weeks I've been engaged in several conversations about the need for a common, interoperable and open set of cloud computing standards. During these conversations a recurring theme has started to emerge. A need for cloud interoperability or the ability for diverse cloud systems and organizations to work together in a common way. In my discussion yesterday with Rich Wolski of the Eucalyptus project he described the need for a "CloudVirt" API similar to that of the Libvirt project for virtualization. For those of you that don't know about libvirt, it's an open source toolkit which enables a common API interaction with the virtualization capabilities of recent versions of Linux (and other OSes). I would like to take this opportunity to share my ideas as well as get some feedback on some of the key points I see for the cre... (more)

Cloud Computing: First-Hand Stories and Use Cases

Kevin Mullins' Blog I have been reading about Cloud Computing, and from my perspective, Cloud Computing is a great tool for startups and organizations that do not have a web based infrastructure, or for folks that need to deploy and scale applications quickly. I can see where large organizations may be a little reluctant to do this, as most large organizations do not have excessive scaling requirements, and most large organizations already have their network and computing infrastructure in place. Some of the more flexible organizations will start to experiment with Cloud Computing, and some may move pieces of their infrastructure into the cloud, however I my thought is that more of the larger organizations will opt to build their own Cloud Computing infrastructure as opposed to moving their data and applications into the cloud. I recently came across a number of pos... (more)