Implementing On-Premise Private and Hybrid Clouds

Eucalyptus Cloud Journal

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Eucalyptus is an open source Infrastructure as a Service cloud offering. What is unique about Eucalyptus is that it is compatible with Amazon AWS APIs. This means that you can: Use Eucalyptus commands to manage Amazon or Eucalyptus instances. Freely move instances between a Eucalyptus private cloud and the Amazon Public cloud to create a hybrid cloud. Eucalyptus leverages operating system virtualization, such as KVM or XEN, to achieve isolation between applications and stacks. Operating system virtualization dedicates CPU and RAM to systems and applications such that they don't interfere with each other. In cloud parlance, this is called isolation and is essential to achieve multi-tenancy. (For a refresher on basic cloud terminology, see here; for a refresher on Infrastructure as a Service, see here). Cloud computing layers on top of operating system virtualization... (more)

ELASTRA Delivers Cloud Portability With Support for Open Source Eucalyptus Platform

ELASTRA announced Elastra Cloud Server support for the Eucalyptus platform. ELASTRA’s products are designed for portability across compute clouds and currently provide support for the Amazon EC2 and S3 compute and storage environments. Because Eucalyptus exposes its virtual machines through an EC2-compatible API, ELASTRA’s portability to Eucalyptus was a straightforward addition to its platform offering. “The Eucalyptus team has combined several useful open source technologies, including Mule, VDE, and libvirt, into a compelling service layer,” said Stu Charlton, chief software architect, ELASTRA. “Work still remains to incorporate richer networking, storage and security capabilities, but we look forward to contributing further to building an open cloud ecosystem.” Eucaplyptus (Elastic Utility Computing Architecture for Linking Your Programs To Useful Systems) is an ... (more)

Cloud Computing: First-Hand Stories and Use Cases

Kevin Mullins' Blog I have been reading about Cloud Computing, and from my perspective, Cloud Computing is a great tool for startups and organizations that do not have a web based infrastructure, or for folks that need to deploy and scale applications quickly. I can see where large organizations may be a little reluctant to do this, as most large organizations do not have excessive scaling requirements, and most large organizations already have their network and computing infrastructure in place. Some of the more flexible organizations will start to experiment with Cloud Computing, and some may move pieces of their infrastructure into the cloud, however I my thought is that more of the larger organizations will opt to build their own Cloud Computing infrastructure as opposed to moving their data and applications into the cloud. I recently came across a number of pos... (more)

Citrix Cloud Center + 3Tera AppLogic Platform = Enterprise-Level Cloud Computing

“We carefully chose 3Tera to be one of our first strategic partners for C3 because of their deep experience offering a full and open cloud computing platform for running multi-tier applications in a massively scalable global cloud," said AJ Jennings, vice president of business development, Citrix Systems, as Citrix and 3Tera announced a partnership combining the new Citrix Cloud Center (C3) solution with 3Tera’s award winning AppLogic Cloud Computing Platform. “Adding XenServer Cloud Edition to our application packaging technology, global cloud presence, and disaster recovery appliances creates the first open cloud computing platform ready for mission critical applications,” said Barry X Lynn, Chairman and CEO, 3Tera (pictured). Lynn added: “As cloud computing moves from early adopters to mainstream users, new customers are demanding enterprise levels of reliability,... (more)

SYS-CON's 1st International Cloud Computing Conference & Expo: Show Report

Dmitry Sotnikov's Blog Overall, very exciting times, and a great event put together by the folks at SYS-CON! There was a lot of excitement and optimism throughout the event. As someone put it: cloud computing is about 700 days old. That means that there are a lot of arguments about definitions, and where things are going, and so on. And that also gives a lot of vibe and a lot of fresh community spirit. Below are my notes from all the sessions I attended at the last week’s Cloud Computing Expo 2008 on: Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 A few general comments on the conference. First and foremost, cloud computing is happening. There was a lot of excitement and optimism throughout the event. And frankly this was quite contrasting to the SOA keeping talking about whether SOA is getting anywhere, how to justify SOA projects, whether it is a journey or a destination, and so on. This was... (more)

The Top 150 Players in Cloud Computing

Cloud Expo Early Bird Savings A robust ecosystem of solutions providers is emerging around cloud computing. Here, SYS-CON's Cloud Computing Journal expands its list of most active players in the fast-emerging Cloud Ecosystem, from the 'mere' 100 we identified back in January of this year, to half as many again - testimony, if any further were needed, to the fierce and continuing growth of the "Elastic IT" paradigm throughout the world of enterprise computing. Editorial note: The words in quotation marks used to describe the various services and solutions in this round-up are in every case taken from the Web sites cited. As ever we encourage software engineers, developers, IT operations managers, and new/growing companies in every case to "suck it and see" by downloading or otherwise sampling the offering in question for themselves. (Omissions to this Top 150 list sh... (more)

Talking to Simon Wardley About Ubuntu and Cloud Computing

Image via Wikipedia Most readers of this blog are probably well aware that a new version of the Ubuntu Linux distribution is coming this week, and that it will be putting code from the Open Source EUCALYPTUS Project to work in simplifying the creation of private Clouds that look remarkably like Amazon’s EC2. You’ve probably also read RightScale’s announcements with respect to Ubuntu, and heard that Sun Microsystems were also making supportive noises about EUCALYPTUS and the EC2 API before their recent change in circumstances. Earlier today I spoke with Simon Wardley of Canonical (the commercial organisation that sells support and consultancy for Ubuntu) to hear a little more about what those downloading Ubuntu will get… and what it might mean for the rapidly shifting Cloud landscape.  Production of this podcast was supported by Talis, and show notes are available on... (more)

Hybridfox: Cross of Elasticsfox and Imagination

Eucalyptus Cloud Journal Now we have a Eucalyptus' Private Cloud installed and running on our premise, and it remained kinda of an artifact in our data-center for sometime. So I thought why has not someone written anything about how make to make Elasticfox work with Eucalyptus. But there were quite a few pointers to what version will be ideally suited to use for Eucalyptus, like this one, thanks Ajmf. I took the cue from there, I enabled debugging on elasticfox, and used firebug to dig deeper. And I came up with Hybridfox, yeah, and it works. What is Hybridfox? Hybridfox is an attempt to get the best of both world of popular Cloud Computing environments, Amazon EC2(public) and Eucalytpus(private). The idea is to use one hybridfox tool, which itself is a modified or extended elasticfox, to switch seamless between your Amazon account and you Eucalyptus Account in orde... (more)

Public and Private Cloud: Two Dimensions in the Same World

The industry is heated with debates on whether adopting private or public cloud is the smartest, best, cheapest, you name it choice. But this debate is missing the mark. Businesses shouldn't be discussing public vs. private, but rather how can they make the two work together to their greatest advantage. The ideal is to merge on-premise and off-premise into a seamless environment that can be managed as a single entity - a forward-looking stance that will eventually see major adoption. But as of late 2013, hybrid cloud was still "rare," noted Gartner analyst Tom Bittman. In his session at 15th Cloud Expo, Marten Mickos, CEO of Eucalyptus Systems, will discuss how public clouds need on-premise satellites to win and, conversely, how on-premise environments cannot be really powerful unless they are connected to the public cloud. It's not two competing worlds; it's two d... (more)

Marten Mickos Joins DevOps Summit at Cloud Expo Faculty

The industry is heated with debates on whether adopting private or public cloud is the smartest, best, cheapest, you name it choice. But this debate is missing the mark. Businesses shouldn't be discussing public vs. private, but rather how can they make the two work together to their greatest advantage. The ideal is to merge on-premise and off-premise into a seamless environment that can be managed as a single entity - a forward-looking stance that will eventually see major adoption. But as of late 2013, hybrid cloud was still "rare," noted Gartner analyst Tom Bittman. Cloud Expo Interview: Marten Mickos on Beer & Cloud Computing In his session at 15th Cloud Expo, Marten Mickos, CEO of Eucalyptus Systems, will discuss how public clouds need on-premise satellites to win and, conversely, how on-premise environments cannot be really powerful unless they are connected ... (more)

Cloud Computing vs. Grid Computing - What's the Difference?

Thorsten von Eicken's RightScale Blog Recently Rich Wolski (UCSB Eucalyptus project) and I were discussing grid computing vs. cloud computing. An observation he made makes a lot of sense to me. Since he doesn’t blog [...], let me repeat here what he said. Grid computing has been used in environments where users make few but large allocation requests. For example, a lab may have a 1000 node cluster and users make allocations for all 1000, or 500, or 200, etc. So only a few of these allocations can be serviced at a time and others need to be scheduled for when resources are released. This results in sophisticated batch job scheduling algorithms of parallel computations. Cloud computing really is about lots of small allocation requests. The Amazon EC2 accounts are limited to 20 servers each by default and lots and lots of users allocate up to 20 servers out of the pool... (more)